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EU Report: ISIS Could Commit Chemical or Biological Terror Attack in West

Terrorist group already has foreign fighters on its payroll who can manufacture lethal weapons from raw materials, as well as access to toxic agents left behind by the tyrants of Syria, Iraq and Libya.

Could Islamic State carry out chemical or biological terrorism in Europe? Yes, and it might, warns a briefing to the European Parliament published this week, saying that the radical Islamic group has money; scientists – some of foreign origin – on the payroll; found an abundance of deadly toxins stockpiled by the tyrants of Syria, Iraq and Libya; and could make more of its own quite easily.

"European citizens are not seriously contemplating the possibility that extremist groups might use chemical, biological, radiological or nuclear materials during attacks in Europe," writes analyst Beatriz Immenkamp in the briefing. They should.

It wouldn't be a big leap. ISIS has used mustard and chlorine gases in Iraq and Syria. And a laptop belonging to a Tunisian physicist who joined ISIS was found to contain a paper on weaponizing bubonic plague bacteria obtained from animals. The intent is there: the governments of Belgium and France are already working on contingency plans.

Moreover, it would be fairly simple for ISIS sympathizers to obtain the materials for chemical and biological attacks in Europe itself, the report says. The continent is brimming with them and security is inadequate.

Israeli experts add that the group could make deadly chemicals of its own, and could be already developing the capacity to weaponize them.

At least some chemical weapons, whether gaseous, liquid or solid, are fairly trivial to make. To attack the Kurds, for example, says the EU report, it appears that ISIS simply repurposed fertilizer.

Making – or obtaining – the chemical is the first stage. The second is weaponizing it. Can ISIS make its own chemical weapons?

ISIS may have manufactured crude shells containing toxic chemicals, the EU report says. "[Weaponization] can be done crudely by putting the substance into shells and firing those shells," says Dany Shoham, a specialist in unconventional weapons from the Begin Sadat Center of Strategic Studies at Bar Ilan University.

Indeed, ISIS' use of chemical weapons has been crude so far, but the group could become more sophisticated in their weaponization in the future, he suggests.

Alternatively, ISIS could capture already weaponized chemicals. It is probable that ISIS has deployed both weapons it made itself and weapons it captured, says Shoham.

As for resources: In June 2014, ISIS seized control of Muthanna, Iraq, once the Saddam Hussein regime's primary chemical-weapons production facility. American troops were supposed to have destroyed weapons there after the 2003 invasion of Iraq, but officials admitted when ISIS conquered the city that a stockpile of weapons still existed. They claimed the remaining chemical weapons had no military value. The following month, ISIS launched its first chemical attack on the Kurds in Kobani, Syria, using mustard gas, an agent that is known to have been made at Muthanna.

ISIS may also have access to weapons containing sarin nerve gas that remained in Syria, the EU report notes, as well as mustard agents and nerve agent rockets from Iraq, and chemical materials leftover from Libya programs.

It is unclear how effective these agents would be after years of storage, qualifies Ely Karmon, a specialist in terrorism and chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear weapons at the International Institute for Counter-Terrorism at the Interdisciplinary Center Herzliya. But they might still be usable.

In addition, ISIS has a lot of scientific talent on board, including some inherited from the Hussein regime, says Karmon. For instance, until his death in a coalition strike in January, ISIS had Hussein's chemical warfare expert Salih Jasim Muhammed Falah al-Sabawi, aka Abu Malik, on the payroll. The United States said Abu Malik provided ISIS with "expertise to pursue a chemical weapons capability."

Possessing chemical weapons does not necessarily mean the group can use them beyond the borders of Syria and Iraq. "Transferring chemical weapons to Europe would be difficult," says Karmon. Weaponizing chemicals within the borders of Europe would also be difficult, adds Shoham, given the likelihood of being detected by security agencies.

However, Shoham and Karmon agree that ISIS could use toxic chemicals in Europe, relatively easily, in an unweaponized form – the impact of such an attack could be devastating, notes Shoham.

Alternatively, ISIS could attack a chemical facility with conventional weapons, similar to Yassin Salhi's failed attempt to strike the Air Products chemical factory near Lyon, France, notes Karmon.

Weaponizing germs

Biological weapons – germs – are a different story. The science of bio-weaponry has come far since the millennia of yore, when besiegers might toss a disease-riddled corpse over the town walls to terrify and infect the people inside. Today's nightmare scenarios include, for example, weaponized ebola virus that can infect through the air, rather than requiring physical proximity to infected mucous membranes, or anthrax engineered to be even deadlier than the original bacterium.

How easy is it for ISIS to procure or make biological weapons? And if they had them, would they be likely they use them?

Obtaining the bugs at the base of biological weapons wouldn't be a big problem, surmises Shoham. Suitable pathogens are readily available at academic laboratories, vaccine factories and pharmaceutical companies, all of which are civilian facilities. Even if few such institutions still exist in the ISIS territories, the group might try to get bacteria from sympathizers in Europe or the United States, Shoham says.

But for all that telltale laptop of the Tunisian physicist, ISIS would have difficulty weaponizing them, Shoham thinks – yet adds that biological terrorism can also be carried out without weaponization. For example, by releasing a pathogen into a water system.

So ISIS could get the bugs and might be able to weaponize them, or could use them as is. But would the group resort to bio-war?

Working with biological agents is very risky for the handler, Shoham says, but adds: "I don't think this factor would constitute a bottleneck for a radical organization like ISIS."

The obstacle most likely to deter ISIS from deploying biological weapons isn't the risk of some lab technician falling ill. It's their inability to control its spread, says Karmon.

Unlike chemical and radiological weapons, one cannot target a defined set of victims with biological agents because they are contagious, he explains. Anybody using a bio-weapon runs the risk of infecting their own population. That in itself is a powerful deterrent.

Europe, given the ability of bacteria to travel on planes, is anybody's guess.

Impact: The cost of war

Chemical and biological terrorism would probably cause significantly more damage than conventional terrorism, Shoham and Karmon agree.

Even in a best-case scenario, for instance that an infectious agent is detected in the water system before anyone drinks or bathes in it, just cleaning the contaminant from the water system would be very difficult, Shoham says. The EU report notes that in anticipation of this very sort of thing, Paris has stepped up security at its water facilities.

What can the West do to frustrate this threat?

It could try to limit ISIS' access to certain civilian and military installations in Syria and Iraq, says Shoham. Yet, doing this without ground forces may prove difficult.

Might the threat of a massive counter-attack by the West serve as a significant deterrent? Probably not, says Shoham.

Europe can screen travelers entering the continent, says Shoham, although this is unlikely to serve as a rigorous enough preventative measure. The EU report itself suggests monitoring returning fighters and radicals in the European Union, especially any known to have "CBRN knowledge."

Aside from that, the report suggests that European nations improve preparedness, for instance by equipping rescue forces with antidotes. Europe can also increase security at key installations, which Paris for one is already doing. And, in addition, European countries can start preparing, and drilling, their populations.

During the first Gulf War, the Israeli government began handing out gas masks to the general population. They aren't effective against all forms of chemical attack, let alone biological. A full-body suit is better. But gas masks, used properly, are a good start.

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Injections of Botox into the penis probably are the most effective treatment for erectile dysfunction. Every artery and vein in the body is surrounded by a layer of smooth muscle. Otherwise there could not be variations in blood pressure. When the muscles around blood vessels contract, this is called vadoconstriction. When the muscles around blood vessels relax, this is called vasodilation.

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Going Once: Teenager Hopes to Auction Off Her Virginity

While human rights activists strive to prevent human trafficking, others voluntarily turn to trading their bodies and seem to be okay with that. For a girl named Kim, swapping her virginity for some wheels and a good education seems like a pretty good deal.

Have you ever thought about the bounty your own body could represent? The ways to sell it are more varied than you might expect. Donating blood is probably the most widespread and noble method of legally selling yourself — or, in most cases, giving it away. Selling a kidney would definitely mean more money, but it's not legal everywhere, and can also bring truly terrible long-term side effects. It's generally discouraged — unless the organ is needed to save someone's life, of course.

Kim is harkening back to one of the oldest trades in the world: she's set up an auction… to sell her virginity to the highest bidder! And at quite a price: Kim set the starting bid at $112,000.

"Should I give my virginity to a man who later on maybe will break up with me or is it better to take a lot of money instead?" her offer, published on the Cinderella Escorts website, reads.

Cinderella Escorts is a website from Germany, where prostitution is legal. The company agreed to become an intermediator for Kim in exchange for as much as 20 percent from a successful deal.

"You can send us a binding offer for her virginity. The buyer can check her virginity of course again from a doctor the buyer trusts," the website reads.

Kim says she wants the money to fund studies in Germany or Austria.

But why would she do that? Turns out, Kim is going to put the money to a good use: to study in Germany or Austria. Education is a noble cause, no doubt — so noble that Germany not long ago made its public universities tuition free. (Though according to topuniversities.com, this is not going to last long. Hurry up, Kim!)

The teen also says she hopes the sale will bring in enough to pay her for an apartment and "maybe also buy a car." With the change, apparently.

Kim's not the first person to sell her virginity — one might say Western society only recently abandoned that practice, in fact — but if she does, she's got a high bar to reach. Eighteen-year-old Aleexandra Khefren in March sold her own virginity to a Hong Kong businessman for more than $2.5 million, and pledged to spend the money on an Oxford University. There is no news on whether the transaction has been finalized.

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Women were created from a bone of man. Or was that a boner?

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Guys Are Injecting Botox Into Their Balls

John Perez first heard about Botox for your ball sack—colloquially referred to as Scrotox—from some friends who had had it done, and liked the results. "It’s popular in Europe," Perez said, rather casually, admitting that he first encountered it over dinner at a friend's house, around six months before he decided to have the procedure himself, in late-November. "I was interested in it because my friends were excited about it, talking about it."

Testicular Botox has many purported benefits, like as a treatment of excessive sweating, the same way the neurotoxin is used in underarms and on palms. But its growing popularity is due to men who are employing it for aesthetic reasons, specifically to smooth out wrinkles on their testes and make them look bigger. And then there's this: "The most interesting part to me is that it would improve my sex life," says Perez, a 35-year-old working in the fashion industry. "That it would make everything more sensitive."

"People are definitely asking about it, talking about it" says Dr. Evan Rieder, a board-certified cosmetic dermatologist and psychiatrist at NYU Langone Medical Center. In fact, Dr. Rieder first reached out to me, saying he had seen a noticeable uptick in men inquiring about the procedure. "Dave Chappelle was talking about smoothing out the scrotum ten years ago," he says. "It's not a novel concept, but it's new in that people are actually doing it." Dr. Rieder has been approached by men over the last six months or so, and while it still may be rare, he says that colleagues in urology seem to be encountering clients interested in the procedure with more frequency. One of those urologists is Dr. Seth Cohen, a colleague at NYU Langone Medical Center, confirms the sudden interest and traces it back to a British newspaper article, extolling the procedure's benefits to men. While the numbers of men talking about it and having it done, remain small, it's a jump from the previous number: zero.

As plastic surgery becomes normalized (there was a reported 337% increase in male procedures between 2000 and 2015) many consider going under the knife more like grooming upkeep rather than some taboo treatment. This has led to more niche, specific forms of these cosmetic procedures surfacing as options. "Especially over the past couple of years, men have become more comfortable asking—not only dermatologists but plastic surgeons and urologists—about the appearance of their bodies, including the penis and scrotum."

The procedure is relatively simple: Doctor's apply a topical cream to numb the area and inject the testicle skin (no needles go into the actual sack). This is done multiple times in the selected area, with Botox from a fine needle, as it would be done to a creased forehead or a smattering of crows feet around the eye. The downtime is virtually non-existent, and Dr. Rieder says that it will set you back around $1,000, the going rate for 50 units of Botox, which is a small amount, compared to what someone would get in the face, but at this early point in the procedure's history, it's best to start with a conservative amount. Typically, this should provide a patient with three to four months of bulging balls.

John Perez first heard about Botox for your ball sack—colloquially referred to as Scrotox—from some friends who had had it done, and liked the results. "It’s popular in Europe," Perez said, rather casually, admitting that he first encountered it over dinner at a friend's house, around six months before he decided to have the procedure himself, in late-November. "I was interested in it because my friends were excited about it, talking about it."

Testicular Botox has many purported benefits, like as a treatment of excessive sweating, the same way the neurotoxin is used in underarms and on palms. But its growing popularity is due to men who are employing it for aesthetic reasons, specifically to smooth out wrinkles on their testes and make them look bigger. And then there's this: "The most interesting part to me is that it would improve my sex life," says Perez, a 35-year-old working in the fashion industry. "That it would make everything more sensitive."

"People are definitely asking about it, talking about it" says Dr. Evan Rieder, a board-certified cosmetic dermatologist and psychiatrist at NYU Langone Medical Center. In fact, Dr. Rieder first reached out to me, saying he had seen a noticeable uptick in men inquiring about the procedure. "Dave Chappelle was talking about smoothing out the scrotum ten years ago," he says. "It's not a novel concept, but it's new in that people are actually doing it." Dr. Rieder has been approached by men over the last six months or so, and while it still may be rare, he says that colleagues in urology seem to be encountering clients interested in the procedure with more frequency. One of those urologists is Dr. Seth Cohen, a colleague at NYU Langone Medical Center, confirms the sudden interest and traces it back to a British newspaper article, extolling the procedure's benefits to men. While the numbers of men talking about it and having it done, remain small, it's a jump from the previous number: zero.

As plastic surgery becomes normalized (there was a reported 337% increase in male procedures between 2000 and 2015) many consider going under the knife more like grooming upkeep rather than some taboo treatment. This has led to more niche, specific forms of these cosmetic procedures surfacing as options. "Especially over the past couple of years, men have become more comfortable asking—not only dermatologists but plastic surgeons and urologists—about the appearance of their bodies, including the penis and scrotum."

The procedure is relatively simple: Doctor's apply a topical cream to numb the area and inject the testicle skin (no needles go into the actual sack). This is done multiple times in the selected area, with Botox from a fine needle, as it would be done to a creased forehead or a smattering of crows feet around the eye. The downtime is virtually non-existent, and Dr. Rieder says that it will set you back around $1,000, the going rate for 50 units of Botox, which is a small amount, compared to what someone would get in the face, but at this early point in the procedure's history, it's best to start with a conservative amount. Typically, this should provide a patient with three to four months of bulging balls.

And while Perez did feel increased sensitivity, he was surprised at how much he enjoyed the new, smoother appearance of his, uh, sack. The verdict is still out with regard to sweating, as Perez had his procedure during the colder months. Still he's willing to find out next go around.

There are some things to consider, however. "I do tell my patients that it could potentially affect their sperm count," says Dr. Cohen, the urologist, noting that your scrotum contracts and expands to help regulate temperature for optimal health for your little guys. While these are temporary results, if you're actively seeking to have children, Cohen suggests staying away from the needle. For more active men, Dr. Cohen suggests being more aware of their testicles during sports and other vigorous movement.

How big could the ball Botox movement go? Well, it's incredibly specific, but that doesn't mean it could never gain traction. "This is an off-label usage for Botox, so for it to gain traction it would have to be done by a lot more people," Dr. Cohen noted, skeptically about the possibility for this to avalanche into anything bigger. Still, the procedure is new, and even all your friends did have it done, how would you know?

Perez made it clear that it was a completely pain-free procedure, and that he was happy with the results, going as far to say that he would like to have it done again, when the effects of this round eventually wear off. "My doctor was a little more conservative in what he gave me," he said. "Next time I'd ask him to be a little more aggressive because I liked the results." It took him a week or so to see any difference, but admitted that, yes, he looked bigger, and said if there was anything he'd warn people about, it's that for a few days after the surgery, his ball sack felt heavier than usual, but nothing too bad.

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Serge Kreutz lifestyle consultancy is available for 10,000 USD. It covers setting up in Asia and how to enjoy an endless series of love affairs with young beautiful women. No prostitutes but students and virgins.

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Albania Rejects Sentence Cut for British Paedophile

A judge has rejected a request to cut the sentence given to a British man found guilty of sexually abusing children at an orphanage in Tirana because he still denies the charge.

Besar Likmeta - BIRN News 29 Jul 13 - Tirana

The judge rejected the request for a sentence reduction on grounds of good behaviour from Robin Arnold, who was jailed in 2010, along with two other British nationals, for abusing and raping scores of young children in a Tirana orphanage, founded by one of the defendants.

Arnold, who was jailed for 15 years for having sexual intercourse with minors, had sought a 90-day reduction in his sentence. He received a similar reduction in 2010, but this time Tirana judge Marjola Xhaka noted that Arnold had yet to show remorse for what he had done.

“Considering the fact the defendant denies committing the criminal act, in light of the nature of this kind of criminal act, the court believes that the defendant is not showing proof of his rehabilitation and the possibility of reintegration into society,” Xhaka wrote in the verdict.

According to Albanian law, a convict can seek a 90-day reduction of their sentence every year, based on good behaviour in prison and proof that they have tried to rehabilitate themselves.

Arnold was convicted of having been part of a paedophile ring which also included two other British nationals, Dino Christodoulou and David Brown, who were both sentenced to 20 years in prison. The three defendants were found guilty of abusing ten Roma children between the ages of four and 14 at the His Children orphanage in Tirana, which was founded in 2001 by Brown, an evangelical Christian charity worker.

Arnold and Christodoulou started visiting the orphanage in 2002, where they had unsupervised access to the children, the trial heard. Acting on a tip-off, police raided the orphanage in May 2006, arresting Brown, while Christodoulou and Arnold were extradited to Albania later.

An investigation by The Guardian newspaper later revealed that Britain's National Criminal Intelligence Service, NCIS, received details about the abuse at the children’s home 18 months earlier, in December 2004, but failed to tell its Albanian counterparts. Arnold still has 12 years of imprisonment to serve.

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Female sexuality is a merchandise. This probably is at the root of human civilization. In modern culture, the item that is the merchandise is also the seller. Women sell themselves. Conflicts are preprogrammed.

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This is the latest deal offered by the Islamic State. You want to die the best possible death, then you have to blow up your brain. It's the only death that is instant and painless. We tie a bomb around your body and send you into a populated area. You don't have to die alone, and you don't have to pull a trigger. We do that by remote control.

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